Tuesday, January 29, 2008

PlantSF

PlantSF is reclaiming little patches of San Francisco greenspace where concrete has taken over. I like this. Even renters can get involved, with the landowner's OK.

http://www.plantsf.org/FeaturedProjects.html

7 comments:

  1. This is such a worthwhile project - what a difference it makes. The 'before' and 'after' pictures are telling.

    It's a step up from guerilla gardening - and can be done in daylight hours.

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  2. Incredible transformation going on in those pics. It certainly looks better than bland grey concrete.

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  3. When we lived in Oakland, I planted what's called the sidewalk strip (we called it the verge). It's a fair amount of work, as the soil is usually really bad--in the beginning ours required an ax to break through the compacted adobe. And I lived across the street from a junior high school, so the plants had to be fairly hardy, as young persons love to pick the flowers and don't mind taking half the plant in the process.

    Here, though, I'd be nervous about planting a verge that had an established tree, just because disturbing the (tree whether by digging or additional watering) might stress it. And the tree is worth more than any planting I might do.

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  4. Oh yes! Yes! YES!Not only are the transformations lovely but anything to help humans re-connect (or to connect)with Mother Nature can't help but improve their outlook. Seems to me that the farther away people get from SOIL, the farther away they are from REALITY.

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  5. Man, what a difference it makes. Those folks are doing good work. Makes the outdoor space so much more livable. Thanks for sharing Angela.

    Sean

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  6. very cool, have you considered using the Mittleider method of gardening. It is perfect for setting up grow boxes Ontop of concrete.

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  7. alan/AboutOrchids10:05 PM

    I go by their plantings at Guerrero & Cesar Chavez Blvd all the time, and they look great. And amazingly nobody's run over the plants in the median strip!

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